Review: WONDER WOMAN

Faulkner once said that the only thing worth writing about was ‘the human heart in conflict with itself.” Or in other words, the human-ness of a story is what makes it or breaks it. Not the “plot” but the “what,” to again quote Faulkner. I loved both BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN and SUICIDE SQUAD, but I will concede that both of them tended to skew more towards the onscreen action, leaving less time for the characterization, the “what” Faulkner spoke about. They had to, to fit in all the plot and action sequences they needed, but if those films had weaknesses, this was the source. A truly perfect film manages to get the balance just right, leaning more in one direction or the other depending on the type of film in question. Action and genre movies must by necessity lean more towards the flash over the fleshing-out. Again, though, a perfect film manages to include just the right amounts of both. WONDER WOMAN manages to achieve that perfect balance.

To put it another way, WONDER WOMAN has enough heart to go with its heroics to satisfy Faulkner’s requirement. It’s old-fashioned and beautiful. It’s as dark as any of the other DC films, but achieves enough lighthearted moments, or at the least stresses the need for the seeking of that light, to keep it from becoming depressing. WONDER WOMAN, the character, is a beacon of hope personified. And so is this movie. By all means, if you haven’t already, go see it!