Review: SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

After two initially successful but ultimately failed Spider-Man franchises, hopes were high, maybe impossibly high, for the new SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING, the wall-crawler’s first film as a part of Marvel Studios wildly successful multi-piece box office juggernaut. How’d it do? Just fine, thank you. This is the Spider-Man movie we’ve all been waiting for. It works as a standalone film and it fits in perfectly with the overall tone of the Marvel cinematic universe. At last Spider-Man is where he belongs, where he should have been all long.

I’ve only read one critic who bashed the film, and this dweeb admitted that he hates superhero movies. Why, then, was he given the task of reviewing one? There’s a reason I don’t write for a sports website–I hate sports. It would be disingenuous of me to take money from somebody to write negative things about a subject I know next to nothing about. That’s crass and indicative of a lack of integrity. Ignoring the idiot in the room, then, SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING has been nigh universally praised by both critics and audiences alike, and deservedly so.

The numerous departures from comics canon didn’t even bother me, probably because this IS the third iteration of the character onscreen. Sure, in the funny books Aunt May is anything but young and hot and we have a Mary Jane instead of a “Michelle.” I’m okay with it. This is a mythology, and mythologies are fluid. Provided the core characters aren’t altered beyond recognizability–and granted Marisa Tomei’s Aunt May is pushing it–it still floats. The Vulture is a doting father in this version, but he’s still the Vulture. We get two Shockers and one of them is black, but they both still basically act like the Shocker should act. Future Scorpion Mac Gargan is appropriately slimy. And by far the most important depiction of them all, that of Spider-Man himself, is the closest we’ve seen yet to the Spider-Man of the comics, the young, early Spider-Man, Stan Lee’s Spider-Man. Overall, I’ll take it.