[NOTE: This article was written on Monday, March 21st.]

I’ve been saying all along that if I was wrong I would gladly admit it. I’m talking about BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN. I’ve been predicting failure for the movie, for numerous reasons. While it’s still too early to say one way or the other—there will be no conclusive answer until I’ve seen the film for myself—the early reviews from fellow geeks coming in are overwhelmingly positive. Even some of the commoner critics, those who don’t “get” genre cinema and are thus unqualified to critique it—not that this ever stops them from doing so—are saying that it’s good; their grousing is limited to the things one would expect, the sorts of things that people who don’t much care for comic book movies would be expected to say. Too action-heavy, too dark, non-comics fans may have a hard time figuring out who’s who, yadda yadda yadda. Not many have said the acting, directing, cinematography or storyline were sub par. In fact several have grudgingly admitted that they were impressed by these. And while many *cough* “professional” critics have grudgingly conceded the films’ quality, the average fan on the street has thus far been shouting with glee from the rooftops.

I was worried that WB was rushing it. I was worried that they were including too many characters, too fast. I questioned their casting choices. (Affleck, Momoa, Miller.) But I’m starting to have hope. Maybe I WAS wrong. I damn sure hope so.

I will have a definitive answer for you, and a full review, next week.

Yeah, we wish. The casting of Affleck was the one decision among all the rest that divided the fan community and firmly implanted doubt in the minds of a multitude regarding the future of the entire DC cinematic universe. And now we get the news that director Zack Snyder DID want Bale—but not as Batman. Boy, is he lucky that Bale didn’t take him up on it. Having the man who SHOULD have played Batman in the film alongside the man they went with, much to the chagrin of so many, would have been an unwelcome reminder to those fans of what COULD have been. It would’ve been like, “Let’s take our audience out of the moment, scrap their suspension of disbelief, and remind ‘em of what pissed ‘em off in the first place!”

Also, Snyder’s assertions that they COULDN’T have used Bale as Batman, because he was “retired,” are ridiculous. Affleck’s Batman is retired, too, until his fears of Superman running rampant spur him to put back on the suit! Ludicrous. The reason they didn’t use Bale is because Bale didn’t want to do the film without Christopher Nolan, and Nolan didn’t want to do the film. The studio SHOULD have just thrown enough money at him until he decided to do it (and then we would have gotten Bale back), but they went in another direction and now, for better or worse, we’re stuck with the results.

source: screenrant.com

In the words of legendary wrasslin’ commentator Jim “Good ol’ JR” Ross, “Bizness is about to pick up!”

I’ve shared my concerns over the “new” Marvel comics in recent posts. Initially those were minimal, but as the months have sped by they have grown exponentially. I’m still digging on THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN, and the new IRON MAN series is on par with previous runs of the armored Avenger’s exploits. But the new take on the AVENGERS books and teams, while there is nothing overtly wrong with them, can’t help but come across as a little lackluster compared to the earlier epic-ness of Jonathan Hickman’s run, preceded by that of Brian Michael Bendis. Unless you’re all about teen angst superheroics, in which case the focus on Ms. Marvel and Nova should be right up your alley. Longtime fans like me, though, we miss the epic-ness that we enjoyed before Marvel allowed the majority of their established writers’ contracts to expire and replaced them with “fresh blood.” The Marvel Universe, post SECRET WARS, just seems smaller these days. But it may be about to grow again.

This new series STANDOFF is returning the real Captain America, Steve Rogers, to his superpowered prime, and looks to be more in tune with big concept stories of the past like SIEGE and SECRET INVASION. Or, if not so grand in scale, it promises to set up an “event” that IS that grandiose, the upcoming CIVIL WAR 2. Will Marvel get its groove back? I sure hope so.

source: ap.ign.com

Technically—if I were speaking that word aloud instead of typing it, I’d draw it out. “Teeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeh-ch-ni-ca-llleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee”—it was a tie. Godzilla, back when the character was licensed to Marvel in the late 70s, took on the Avengers. And the Fantastic Four. And SHIELD. He would’ve taken on Spider-man, too, but Spidey was late to the party. And combined might of those vaunted heroes failed to take down the big gray-green titan, which—as a lifelong Godzilla fan, I must attest—is how it should be. Earth’s Mightiest Heroes DID manage (with help from some kid) to convince Godzilla to take a hike. Or maybe Big G just got bored. Either way, there was no clear-cut victor. Superhero fans could hold their heads high after the fight (which took place in issue 24 of Godzilla’s Marvel series) and the Godzilla faithful felt satisfied, too. Sure, there were grousers, and there still are. “The Avengers should’a won!” or “Godzilla would’a totally fried ‘em all!” But neither of those could happen.

Marvel didn’t OWN Godzilla, see. They were just renting him. As part of their agreement with Toho Studios, they had to treat the King of the Monsters with all due reverence. They couldn’t depict him getting his scaly hide handed to him by a bunch of costumed do-gooders. Neither was Marvel about to let their top characters—ALL of them—get schooled by any giant monster, not even the greatest of them all. After the rights for the Godzilla character reverted to Toho, Marvel did pull a sneaky and have a giant green beastie show up, one that looked and acted an awful lot like Godzilla but was never mentioned by name, and then they had this faux-zilla get its arse kicked. That fight wasn’t canon, though, and it wasn’t reeeeeeeeeeeally Godzilla.

source: goodcomics.comicbookresources.com