Looks like the rumors were true. Sorta. DC has taken notice of declining sales figures and grousing, increasing in volume, from its hardcore faithful readership, and is now willing to admit—sorta—that the “new 52” has been a failure. Sure, it snagged plenty of attention at the outset. But as the new series all plodded on, fans soon began to pine for the good ol’ days when Superman wore red underwear (with yellow belt) over his blue suit, and Barbara Gordon was paralyzed from being shot by the Joker in the classic THE KILLING JOKE graphic novel. If the New 52 was DC’s attempt at having an Ultimate version of their universe, ala Marvel, then it came to an end much quicker than did the latter “reimagining.” Sorta.

Geoff Johns, the Chief Creative Officer over at DC, has promised that its upcoming event, REBIRTH, is NOT a reboot. However, he states that the event will restore the “legacy” of the DC Universe, giving back those elements that fans have been missing. Personally I suspect the hesitance to call it a “reboot” has to do with fan fatigue connected with the term in general, as REBIRTH certainly fits all the criteria, by definition, of a reboot. They aren’t throwing away EVERYthing from the New 52, though, but splicing back into the fabric enough of the “classic” DC Universe to appease longtime fans while hanging onto the new ones they acquired via their LAST reboot. Just how much will the new DC resemble the old, and arguably better, one? (I admit I hope to
see the return of Superman’s red underwear. But that’s just me.)

source: www.comicbookresources.com

It’s deliciously appropriate that Deadpool would be the one to do this. The movie bearing his name just destroyed all expectations—these based off the flawless “system” employed by simpleminded studio executives to predict whether or not a movie project will be successful, and just how successful it will be—by opening to a bigger box office than had been predicted. How much bigger? Oh, 75 to 100 million, depending on which projection we’re talking about. For the record, DEADPOOL was the highest grossing R-rated motion picture EVER, had the largest single opening day for an R-rated film EVER, the biggest opening in February ever (this last one isn’t THAT impressive, since all it had do was top FIFTY SHADES OF CRAP), and the biggest opening weekend for Fox Studios EVER, beating STAR WARS EPISODE THREE: REVENGE OF THE SITH. Not bad for a flick nobody (but its star) wanted to make.

Why was the movie such a smash? I credit three factors. Ryan Reynolds has never been a great thespian, but he is rock solid in this role; Deadpool is custom-made for him. Also, it’s February. The cinema is typically devoid of tasty geek fare in February, excepting the big holiday movies that are still playing but everybody has seen already. Lastly, because it’s Deadpool. The character is just plain loveable. He’s come a long, long way from the days of his inception, when he was a cheesy rip-off of Spider-Man named after the lamest of the Dirty Harry movies. When did he become so original? When they decided to make him crazy. Crazy is loveable, peeps. Crazy sells.

No, I didn’t watch it. I have never watched it, and, unless someone ties me down and pins my eyelids open, like they did to Malcolm McDowell in A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, and plop me down in front of a television at the prescribed time, I will NEVER watch it. There are only six people in the continental United States who don’t like or watch the (so-called) Super Bowl. Your intrepid reporter is two of those; I hate football that much. (Sports in general, really.) Yes, I am male. Yes, I am heterosexual. Yes, I know I am an anomaly. I never even tuned in just to watch the commercials, which a lot of non-football fans do. If I hear of a commercial that interests me, I just google it. Which is how I saw the ad featuring the Incredible Hulk and Ant-Man.

Kudos to Coke for the best 30 seconds of the night. No, I haven’t seen all the commercials. I don’t have to. I KNOW the Hulk vs. Ant-Man commercial was the best. The ad for CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR came in a close second. I’m still too trepidatious about the BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN flick to get too excited over the trailers. The Coke ad was funny. It prominently featured two of the most popular characters in Comic cinema today. And best of all, it had nothing to do with sports. It just happened to air during a sporting event, one which, as I have told you, I did not see but you probably did. That means you’ve probably seen the commercial, too. You probably saw it before I did, and laughed at it before I did. But you know what they say, “He who laughs last . . .”

source: www.superherohype.com

Bruce Banner himself has officially confirmed it. There will be no standalone Incredible Hulk movies anytime soon. It has nothing to do with the fact that the last such film, 2008’s THE INCREDIBLE HULK, was not a ratings monster. And it has even less to do with Ang Lee’s dysfunctional 2003 HULK, which was really a remake of KING KONG if Kong were hairless and green. Marvel could easily overcome such past failures these days. Look at the hype the new Spider-Man movie is getting, fresh on the heels of the tacky and terrible AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2. Just the fact that it would be a Marvel movie, produced by Marvel Studios, would be enough to get people into the theater to see it. No, Marvel won’t give us another standalone Hulk film because they don’t want to share.

Back before Marvel Studios became such a box-office juggernaut and before Disney bought the big M and made it even more of a force to be reckoned with, Marvel farmed out a lot of their properties, and Universal still owns the rights to any standalone film. They do not, however, have any claim on the Hulk character. That’s why Marvel is going to put the Green Goliath in a bunch of its upcoming films. He’ll just have to share the screen with other prominent Marvel characters, is all. Which, come to think of it, is not in any way a bad thing.

source: www.cinemablend.com