Sorry, Frank Miller. Or Brian Azzarello. The linked-to article doesn’t specify which of the two co-writers of DARK KNIGHT 3: THE MASTER RACE actually said that this new comic, and specifically its introduction of a FEMALE in the role of “Batman,” is going to “piss people off.” I kinda doubt that it does. It just isn’t that big a deal nowadays. I know this will disappoint Frank, who delights in rubbing fans the wrong way.

Miller’s THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS became an instant classic when it was released back in the 80s. It introduced an old, retired Bruce Wayne (who quickly enough came out of retirement) and a female Robin. That girl sidekick has now risen up to take over the role of Gotham City’s Caped Crusader. This would be more newsworthy if DC hadn’t already done it with the character Batwoman a few years back. And after the sequel to THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS, which debuted several years back, failed to leap over the critical and creative bar set so high by its predecessor, this latest effort has even more to live up to. Can Frank pull off the hat trick?

source: nypost.com

So let’s see if we can get this straight. The reason Captain America Steve Rogers and stand-in Captain America Sam Wilson are no longer on speaking terms is because one’s a Democrat and one’s a Republican? And we’re given the rather trite challenge of trying to guess which one is which? Um, no. That would be too simplistic and, given that Marvel doesn’t want to risk alienating any longtime fans (or new ones, recruited by their cinematic universe), pretty dumb. No, Captain America must represent ALL Americans. He can’t take political sides. He must remain neutral. At least that’s how Steve Rogers views it, and so do I.

Sam, though, wants to take a more active role in political matters. That’s the crux of their argument. It’s an intriguing story idea, having Sam as Cap speaking out more openly on certain issues than Steve did. Marvel can be a little controversial—remember, the Captain America comic has in the past offended some Rightwing group, and reaped some free publicity from it—without tarnishing the iconic character as he is depicted in the movies. How far are they willing to go? Just how vocal will Falcon-Cap be? We’ll just have to wait to find out.

source: io9.com

Times sure have changed, and they changed pretty fast. Just a few short years ago, the hinting that a comic character MIGHT be gay was enough to get a writer fired (Remember when Northstar was “outted” in Alpha Flight?) and have fans boycotting. Now you can’t turn a comic book page without hitting a gay character. This is a good thing. I believe comics SHOULD feature a wider diversity of characters; not all our heroes and villains need to be heterosexual white males. Comics should reflect real life in that regard. People come in all shapes, sizes, colors, religions and sexual orientations.

Do you sense a “but” coming?

BUT. If it feels forced. (If you are retconning an established character, for example.) Even when handled by a master scribe like Brian Bendis. If you are basically shoehorning a character into a new role—Let’s make this hero a female! Let’s make this hero gay! Oh, we need a Latino superhero now. Let’s create one!—just for the sake of having a gay/Latino/Muslim/vegan/whatever, it becomes a case of tokenism. That’s a bad word. “Token.” It cheapens the value of that diversity creators are trying to establish in comics.

Iceman has been around for 50 years. And we’re just NOW learning that he is gay?

source: www.advocate.com

After watching the FIRST fantastic fiasco to be played out on the silver screen and leaving the theater grousing and shaking my fists at the sky, lamenting the film’s greatest sin, the grave disservice it had done to Doctor Doom, my lovely better half, not as up on her comics culture as you or I, asked me, “What’s so great about Doom, anyway.” This launched me into a fifteen minute diatribe on Marvel’s greatest villain.

First, I explained that Doom is only a villain in that he frequently tussles with superheroes. His motivations, though, are ultimately noble. Doom wants to save the world. He wants to see an end to the sufferings brought about by human frailty. It’s just that he’s such an egomaniac, he believes the only way he can save the world is to conquer it and impose his inflexible will upon it. The only way he can protect the human race is to rule over it. But Doom isn’t motivated by hate (except his hatred for Reed Richards). The Fantastic Four are passé and have been for quite some time, but Doom is as vital as ever. Marvel needs him.

And my lovely better half, after hearing me extol Doom’s virtues, began to shake her fists at Hollywood, as well. To know Doom is to love him.

source: www.vox.com