DC Entertainment will now give Bill Finger official credit for his work in film and television projects based on his creations, including Batman v Superman.

This is a long overdue honor, and is still incomplete. Writer Bill Finger needs to be credited in EVERY Batman comic, should be credited on every television show, every cartoon, every movie in which Batman appears. Retroactively there isn’t much we can do; an awful lot of Batman comics have been printed, giving sole credit for the character’s creation to artist Bob Kane. But we can educate today’s casual fan. We can make sure to properly give the credit deserved from this point onward. Better late than never, and justice delayed is not necessarily justice denied.
All Bob Kane did was draw the character, and this under Finger’s direction. (Kane originally envisioned a character named “Birdman.”) It was Finger who named the character, and the character’s alter ego Bruce Wayne. It was Finger who devised Batman’s origin story and crafted all the mythos with which we are so familiar today. Finger is to Batman what Stan Lee is to Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, Iron man, the Hulk, etc. and etc.—if Jack Kirby had selfishly stolen all the credit for himself, which is what Bob Kane did, actively excluding Finger as the rightful co-creator of the world’s most recognized superhero. Batman would not have approved.

source: www.superherohype.com

Man of Steel and Watchmen director Zack Snyder responds to Steven Spielberg’s comments on superhero movies and addresses the rumor mill around the DCU.

I’ve actually been a little worried about this myself. Commenting in the past on the Hollywood beast’s inability to generate any original ideas, lamenting its tendency to simply mimic what is currently popular and churning out one comic-based flick after another while giving no thought as to what, exactly, makes those successful examples of the genre work in the first place. And Hollywood will continue to do this, snatching up ANY comic property, no matter how obscure, no matter how unlikely those properties are to make any money at the box office, completely out of touch with the movie-going public, regurgitating what they believe to be a secret formula to big box office returns while milking the cash cow to death. It is only natural that people will eventually get sick of it all. Is Steven Spielberg right? Will we see a day when NO comic book movie will perform well in theaters?

Zack Snyder shares my concern that Spielberg might be accurately prognosticating the fate of the genre. However, he maintains that the only thing a director of such films can do is try to make the best movies possible, hoping that quality will win out despite Hollywood running the whole comic book one hoss shay into the ground. I concur, and as long as there are those who pursue quality over quantity where superheroes are concerned, the reign of the spandex-wearing superstar has miles and miles left to run before it implodes.

source: www.superherohype.com

and it’s exactly who you think it is.

Well, I called it. If you don’t believe me, do a quick search for my previous article on this site concerning the identity of the “Totally Awesome” Hulk. Come on, people, was this even a surprise? I can’t be the only one who saw it coming ten miles away. Writer Greg Pak, returning to duties chronicling the exploits of Marvel’s Jade Juggernaut, has a lengthy history with Amadeus Cho. Cho was his character. Basically a younger, Asian version of Bruce Banner, Cho is a super genius techno geek, just like Banner, but with a post-modern flair. Who else would Pak put in the spotlight but Cho? Well, anybody, if he wanted to not be predictable, but whatever.

Thing is, I enjoyed Pak’s run on the series in the past; I liked his portrayal of Cho as the Hulk’s sidekick. I liked Cho as a character. I MIGHT be interested in this new series, seeing Cho transformed into a hulk all his own—if the whole thing didn’t feel so overcooked. I mean, how many times has Bruce been replaced as the Hulk in the past few years? And even when it’s the same guy turning into the monster, depictions of the Hulk have been totally inconsistent. I feel like we haven’t been given a straightforward Hulk story, a classic Hulk story, in too long. Sadly, Pak’s new story, instead of being something fresh and new, looks dully familiar.

source: games.yahoo.com

It isn’t news that Hollywood is incapable of actual thought. “Hollywood” is a mass organism, a parasite, sort of like a Portuguese Man-O-War, a composite animal, a siphonophore (loving the word “siphon” makes up this name, as it’s so apropos for the point I want to make here), a cluster of millions of micro-celled organisms all living and working together. Any microorganism that doesn’t just go along with the flow, that displays individual thought or initiative, will likely be expelled from the mass. Like the man-o-war, Hollywood cannot swim, cannot move itself, is at the mercy of the ocean’s currents to get around. Hollywood, in other words, though it is capable of delivering a painful sting, is really rather stupid.

Superheroes are the thing right now. Comic book movies. So what does the Hollywood beast do in response? Certainly it does not stop to examine WHY movies like the Avengers or Christopher Nolan’s DARK KNIGHT trilogy are so successful. It just assumes, stupidly, that ANY comic book movie will be similarly successful. Thus we see a whole slew of projects getting green-lighted that ANY fan could tell them won’t do worth a flip. Jonah Hex, anyone?

Two high profile stories ran on Bleeding Cool yesterday, that laid out certain woes at DC Comics. 

When DC Comics chose to wipe the slate clean and start over back in 2011, canceling all their titles and erasing their established continuity, relaunching all the books as first issues and creating an all new, all different universe in order to woo new readers, it looked like a huge success. Sales went up—way up—and for the first time in, oh, EVER DC began to outsell Marvel. It does appear now, with five years perspective, this temporary bump in sales is attributable to the novelty effect. Or the train-wreck effect, depending on who you ask. DC’s current sales figures, though, provide undeniable proof; the New 52 has been a failure. Sales are lower now than they were before DC rebooted.

In spite of the fact that some excellent stories have come out of the New 52—Scott Snyder’s run on the Batman books, or the initial Justice League reintroduction, before the writers lost their way with all that multiverse, alternate dimensional crap; and I was overjoyed to see Swamp Thing revamped and brought back into the DC mainline—fan reaction to the New 52, which ain’t so new anymore, has overall ranged from lukewarm to hostile. Sales are reflecting that. Might we see a return to the pre-New 52 DC universe in the days to come?

source: www.bleedingcool.com

After all the build up I share Clark’s emotions at the end of the issue. Not with Lois Lane and her galactically stupid error in judgement – but with DC.

The fanbase is divided over the new direction the SUPERMAN comics have taken, as indeed they have been since the launch of DC’s “New 52” continuity back in 2011. Look at this reviewer, for example, whom I’m only linking to in order to provide a counterpoint to my own argument. He is a major Superman fan, hence the website he maintains in honor of the Man of Steel, and he absolutely loathes the current storyline. All of his complaints are valid—as the opinions of any fan are valid—but I happen to disagree with them. I’m digging what they’re doing with the character, even if I don’t believe this will remain fixed as the new status quo.

For those who’ve not been following the developments, Superman’s powers have gone all screwy. This couldn’t have happened to him at a worse time, as his secret identity is a secret no longer. It was revealed to the world by Lois Lane! See, some clandestine criminal organization had already learned it, and were using the knowledge to blackmail Superman, so to take that power away from them, Lois “outted” Clark. Now Superman is on the run, in hiding, and not able to depend on his full range of powers. I like it. I’m enjoying the ride and curious to see where it leads. Is new writer Gene Luen Yang painting himself into a corner? Perhaps. Or maybe he knows something we, the fans, do not.

source: www.supermanhomepage.com

He’s getting just old enough for this s–t.

Hey, I have an idea! Let’s replace Bruce Wayne as Batman! That’s NEVER been done before! (Except for a couple’a dozen times, but nobody remembers any of those. Comics fans have lousy memories, right?) Then we’ll put some guy in armor and let him play Batman, until Bruce inevitably returns to great fanfare and reclaims the mantle. It’ll be great! Sales will skyrocket! How original we’ll be!

Everything I just wrote could also apply to the 90s fiasco that was KNIGHTFALL. Bruce gets injured and a new character, Azrael, takes over, doing his best impersonation of Iron Man by turning the Bat costume into some super high-tech, wearable robot. The creators string it out, making the fans wait, before finally bringing back the REAL Batman. They did the same thing with Dick Grayson (call him Robin the First) subbing for Bruce, only without “improving” the costume. It’s tired, it’s played-out, and it smacks of a dearth of ideas. It’s also boring.

That being said, at least this latest attempt, spearheaded by writer Scott Snyder (who was responsible for the excellent “Court of Owls” storyline, one of the best in recent years) feels a little less contrived than the 90s version, or even the stunt of putting Robin in the Batsuit (for the second time!). Commissioner Gordon as Batman? Why not. Everybody else has had a turn.

source: www.mtv.com