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Even by comic book standards, this character isn’t going to stay dead for long. I remember back when DC foolishly let Grant Morrison, the most overrated writer in comics, as far as I’m concerned, kill off Bruce Wayne and replace him with former Robin Dick Grayson. The powers-that-be at DC promised that we wouldn’t be seeing Bruce again for a long time. Then sales figures must have spoken, because faster than a snap of the fingers Bruce was back and there was talk of killing off Dick! It’s absurd. Just as absurd as the recent killing off of the Incredible Hulk, Bruce Banner. The latter, though, may prove even more ridiculous, as his “death” will likely last for an even shorter duration.

It’s true that Marvel hasn’t been using Bruce too much here lately, instead focusing on their boy-genius-cum-“totally awesome” hulk (note the lowercase “h”) Amadeus Cho. (Oh, I forgot to mention the most important attribute of the new hulk; he’s a totally awesome KOREAN boy genius, yet another example of Marvel forced PC tokenism.) Box Office dollars are far more powerful than PC notions, though, and there’s a new THOR movie coming out next year, a film in which the Hulk (note the capital “H”) is playing a major role. We can expect Bruce to stay “dead” until opening night, at the latest. Pathetic gimmickry.

source: comicvine.gamespot.com

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So Rob Liefeld has come out with a brutal, scathing indictment of SUICIDE SQUAD. Who gives a rat’s ass? Nobody SHOULD, but unfortunately Liefeld is milking his status as the co-creator of Deadpool for all that its worth and has thus managed to gain the ear of pop culture hipsters who don’t know anything else about him, don’t know how ungodly BAD the vast majority of this goober’s work is and has been, don’t remember Image in its early days; if they did, they’d know not to pay attention to anything this pipsqueak says about anything. Liefeld DREW Deadpool, originated the visual appearance of the character, but writer Louise Simonson created everything else having to do with him. The same way that Bob Kane tried to steal all the credit for creating Batman at the expense of Bill Finger, who did most of the heavy lifting, Liefeld has in the past sought to downplay Simonson’s role. True comics geeks know better—and we know not to give Liefeld the time of day.

Here’s an opinion that actually holds weight, that of writer John Ostrander, whose role in the Suicide Squad comic franchise is so prominent that he got a building in the film named after him. Ostrander nailed it with this statement: “I know some of the critics, both in print and online, do not like the movie. That’s okay; everyone has a right to their own opinion even when it’s wrong. My problem is that…the critic is also tired of superhero and “tentpole” films and, overtly or covertly, would like to see their end. Look, I get it— they have to see all the films out there and they must be tired of all the blockbusters…I think that’s [what is] going on here…Just as I came prepared to love the movie, they came prepared to hate it.” Damn straight, Johnnie! You tell ‘em!

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With each biased, unprofessional, put-the-paycheck-before-any-shred-of-journalistic-integrity, clickbait-y, pretentious, and perfidious review a modern “professional” movie critic writes, he becomes less relevant. And this is a good thing. Simply put, we don’t need the critics anymore, not with the Internet. Moviegoers are perfectly capable of making up their own minds now, thank you very much, without some blowhard telling them how to think, and if a consensus of opinion on any particular film is needed or desired, one can connect with any number of peers with the click of a mouse to solicit said consensus. Critics are an endangered species; they are going extinct. They can’t die off fast enough to suit me.

SUICIDE SQUAD is a blast. Just as with BATMAN VERSUS SUPERMAN earlier this year, the piling-on of negative reviews is largely for show and equally as groundless. The acting here is fine and dandy: Leto brings his own take to the Joker, and while he isn’t onscreen nearly enough he is like a shot of nitrous surging through the narrative engine when he does make an appearance; Margot Robbie is terrific as Harley Quinn, managing to be adorable, pitiable, and scary all at the same time; Will Smith delivers a dead-on Deadshot; and Viola Davis is Oscar-worthy as Amanda Waller. (Frankly she’s Oscar-worthy in anything she does, but still.) I only had one complaint with the film; there is one big implausibility that the script never addresses: How the hell did Harley get hold of a cell phone?

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Being a comics fan is like riding a roller coaster. First off, it gets kind of costly if you keep doing it (Admission to those amusement parks ain’t cheap!), there’s a lot of waiting involved, and the experience is all ups and downs. A recent example for me was when I first heard that Ghost Rider was going to be coming to the ABC network’s MARVEL’S AGENTS OF SHIELD. Finally, I thought, one of my favorite comic book characters is going to be treated with the respect he deserves! A fresh start, far removed from that pair of abominations headed by Nicholas Cage. (Talk about ups and downs. Here’s a guy who won an Oscar, and somehow he’s transformed into the worst actor in Hollywood. Did he stop caring? Is that what happened? Or did a talent vampire suck all the ability out of him? If the latter is the case, he seems to have also been attacked by a likeability vampire.)

Then the bottom dropped out on me. Turns out it won’t be the Johnny Blaze Ghost Rider at all, but the automobile-driving Robbie Reyes. Not the real Ghost Rider. While Reyes is just another obvious attempt for Marvel to force racial diversity into its publishing line by way of tokenism, I didn’t hate him as much as I did some others because he is a separate character rather than a straight replacement. (I DID hate his comic, though, as it had by far the worst, most caricaturist artwork I’ve ever seen in a mainstream publication.) Oh, well. I didn’t really wanna watch AOS anyway.

source: www.superherohype.com

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There are only a few pop culture and literary icons that could get me to go to a movie theater on a Monday night (unless it’s a holiday), and Batman is near the top of that list. The new animated film, BATMAN: THE KILLING JOKE, received a special limited release for two nights only, July 25th and 26th. Though my local movie house was one of those showing the film, they were only showing it on one of the two nights, thus a special Monday night viewing for your intrepid reporter. This film is one of those rare examples of an R-rated animated production. Even though clearly advertised as such, I’m betting some unobservant parents out there will bring their children, as we all know that anything animated must be for kids, right? Then they’ll get all huffy and offended. The Joker would find this amusing, I think, and I confess that I would too.

THE KILLING JOKE, the graphic novel written by Alan Moore with art by Brian Bolland, remains one of the finest Batman stories ever created, and also one of the most controversial. It’s the story that put Barbara Gordon in a wheelchair (though DC recently retconned her out of it) and hints at an assault of a decidedly sexual nature. Does the film match the quality of the comic? Ooooooh, yeah. The animation looks like the comic brought to life, the extraneous material added for the film supports rather than detracts from the production, and Mark Hamill’s Joker has never been better, or creepier. (If any of you still have doubts after watching this film about Hamill’s being an underrated, phenomenal talent, I recommend you check out the movie SUSHI GIRL. He is brilliant.) I wouldn’t have minded if they’d gone for an even edgier, harder R rating, though.

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Remember the bad old days, the low water mark of the comics industry? Image had just launched, igniting the speculator market. Marvel, meanwhile, was greedily overprinting everything—QUASAR had his own ongoing series, for cryin’ out loud!—in an attempt to put all the smaller presses out of business. They largely succeeded, but managed to drive themselves into bankruptcy in the process. In the long run this was a good thing. New people took over the running of the company, people who actually cared about the quality of their product; this improved approach led to greater success and the eventual purchase by Disney. The rest is history, as they say. But does history have to repeat itself?

The dearth of quality is still absent from Marvel Comics today—for now. But look at all the new titles that are about to be published under the Marvel NOW initiative, books that don’t have a chance in hell of succeeding long-term: Solo; Prowler; Cage (again); Gwenpool (?!?); Slapstick; Foolkiller; etc. Is Marvel trying to glut the market again? Or have they reached a level of success where they are willing to experiment on riskier books and characters? I hope it isn’t the former. I would’ve hoped they’d learned their lesson on that one.

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Marvel is like Crack, man. Or a case of poison ivy. You think you’re done with it, you think you’re over it, but it lures you back. The addiction comes back, and you start itching all over again. When I heard that Tony Stark was going to be replaced as Iron Man—AGAIN!—and that his replacement was going to be a teenage black girl, I said, that’s it. I’m done. No more Marvel for me. As excellent as the new CIVIL WAR II  storyline has been, I’m sick of this trend towards replacing prominent characters with younger upstarts of a different skin pigmentation. It’s pure tokenism. It’s forcing “diversity” when such things only work if they happen naturally. A black Cap (and some people want to make him a GAY Cap), a Korean Hulk, a female Thor (this one bothers me the least of the current “re-inventions” of classic heroes, as the original is still around), a black/Hispanic Spider-Man. And “NOW” they’re booting Tony Stark as Iron Man to shoehorn in some character with a history of barely six months. No thank you, I said. I’m out.

Then I find out that Dr. Doom, my favorite comics villain, who is SUPPOSEDLY reformed (yeah, right) will be putting on Tony’s armor and playing ANOTHER Iron Man. Oh, Marvel, you sneaky bastards. Fine. I WILL read THE INFAMOUS IRON MAN (aka Dr. Doom in Different Armor.) And I’ll probably love it. But I will NOT read Iron Man 90210. Not now, not ever.

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In a sense, the Internet has ruined us. For all its gifts, it has brought new travails with it. Having all the information, the sum total of all human knowledge, right at our fingertips, is a blessing, but along with that blessing we have to put up with Internet trolls. We get our news reports in real time, literally as important events are happening, yet we can’t escape hearing about the Kardashians. You have to take the good with the bad. Let’s discuss the effects of having this ability to post one’s thoughts for all the world to see, with no filtration system and no minimum requirements concerning age or intelligence, on human behavior. It skews things. We get things like what I call the “Pile-On Effect.” Bashing a thing, a film, a celebrity, what have you, becomes a social construct. Such attacks are largely meaningless.

To point out the transience and irrelevance of such phenomena, I submit to you BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE. Hatin’ on it had become trendy long before the film opened in theaters. But honestly now, how many of those doing the hating had made their minds up before ever seeing the picture? How many had even SEEN the picture before writing their scathing “reviews” on Twitter or Facebook? Now the pendulum has swung, with the release of the R-rated version of Zack Snyder’s film. Those same people who were bashing it before are now praising it, blaming studio interference for perverting Snyder’s “vision.” It is now hip and trendy to reverse direction. Fickleness has become the new normal. The moral of this story: Don’t believe anything you read on the Internet. The Internet magnifies misinformation. It glorifies it.

source: www.screengeek.net

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Hey, look, everybody. I’ve found this week’s imbecile extraordinaire. You all may recall that nonsense last month where people, non-fans, or transient fans, people who watch the movies, maybe, but who have never picked up a comic book in their sheltered, shallow lives, were petitioning Marvel to make Captain America and Bucky a gay couple. I wasted no time in proclaiming the stupidity inherent in this idea, and hoped we had all heard the end of it. Alas, it was not to be. Someone recently asked the Winter Soldier himself, Sebastian Stan, what he thought of the matter. “Movies are for people to relate to in whatever way they want,” Stan said. “No one here is ever going to point a finger and say what’s right and wrong. For me, it’s like, Awww. It’s cute, it’s great. If someone takes the time to think about that, that’s great. I don’t think of the character that way, though.”

Yet the writer of this linked article wasted no time in announcing that Stan was “on board” with the idea and urged Marvel to “make this happen.” How in the holy hell can you interpret Stan’s comments as his being “on board” with the idea when he clearly stated that he does NOT see the characters’ relationship like that? Twisting his words to make him say what you want to hear, that’s what you’re doing. Nitwit.

source: www.yahoo.com

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It’s interesting, how DC chose to deal with their failed “New 52” problem and their return to the “real” DC Universe, and with no character have things become more interesting—I won’t say it is anything more than “interesting” until later, as it’s too early to tell just yet whether the storyline will turn out awesome or mediocre—than with Superman. Supes is sort of a microcosm of the entire DC Universe right now. And a litmus test. If it works with their flagship character—yes, Superman even outranks Batman in this regard—then it MIGHT work for the entire Universe.

The New 52 Superman is dead. The Superman from the real DC Universe has stepped back into the red boots as his replacement, but so has Lex Luthor, who is busy playing Superman. And somehow the Clark Kent who was the New 52 Superman is still alive, or so it seems. So we’ve got a dead Superman, a live Superman, an imposter Superman, and TWO Clark Kents. It’s all very…interesting. My only complaint so far is that Superman—the original, the “real” one—now has a kid. Giving him a kid was a bad move when they tried it in the movies (SUPERMAN RETURNS) and I fear the little brat will be an albatross around the creators’ necks in the comics, as well. I could go off the kid, as the Brits would say. But the rest of it has well and truly snagged my—wait for it—interest. Has it snagged yours?